This tool is part of the Citrus Resource

Citrus ID

 

Pineapple

 

Synonyms

 

Hicktory, Pineapple-156, Ridge Pineapple, Ridge Seedling (sec. Cottin 2002)

Cultivar or taxon

 

Citrus x aurantium L., pro sp. [Sweet Orange Group] (sensu Mabberley 1997, Bayer et al. 2009); Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck (sensu Swingle and Reece 1967; sensu Tanaka sec. Cottin 2002)

Origin

 

Hodgson (1967) noted that: "The Pineapple originated as a seedling on the place of J. B. Owens at Sparr, near Citra, Florida, and is said to have come from seed planted soon after 1860 (Ziegler and Wolfe, 1961). It was first propagated by P. P. Bishop at Citra about 1873 under the name of Hickory and some ten years later was renamed Pineapple because of its delicate fragrance. Its attractiveness, fine flavor, and good market reception brought about some increase in use, but it was not until after the 1894-95 freeze, which necessitated extensive replanting, that its popularity developed. It soon became the principal midseason variety and has remained so ever since. It is a major variety in Florida and of considerable though decreasing importance in Brazil and South Africa. Of increasing popularity in Florida is the Queen variety, which may have originated as a Pineapple seedling. Two virtually seedless limb sports have been found—Seedless Pineapple, discovered in 1932 on Merritt Island, Florida (U.S. Plant Patent 477), and more recently (1948) a variety named Plaquemines, which originated as a limb sport in Louisiana. Varieties that are considered to be derivatives in South Africa include Belvedere, which is indistinguishable from Pineapple, and Gem and Letaba, both of which are less seedy and earlier in maturity. A seedling clone that exhibits resistance to the burrowing nematode in Florida has recently been named Ridge Pineapple."

The Chiefland Budwood Facility (2010) provided the following notes on the cultivar (clone 53-10-10): "Cultivar came from the Wartman properties in Citra in Marion County. Entered into budwood program in 1956."

The Chiefland Budwood Facility (2010) provided the following notes on the cultivar (clone F-60-3): "Nucellar line from Lake Garfield Nursery, Entered into program in 1958 (SPB-53). Planted in the I-4 Foundation in 1960."

The Chiefland Budwood Facility (2010) provided the following notes on the cultivar (clone SPB-150-3): "The Chase Pineapple from Windermere in Orange County. Entered program in 1957. This cultivar has good yields. Discontinued - Not maintained in the Chiefland Foundation."

Description

 

Crown compact or dense, not weeping. First-year twig surface glabrous; second- or third-year twig surface striate; thorns straight; prickles absent or not persistent. Petiole glabrous, length medium; wings narrow, adjoining the blade. Leaflets one, margin bluntly toothed, shade leaflet blades flat or weakly conduplicate, sun leaflet blades weakly conduplicate. Scent of crushed leaflets sweetly orange-like. Fruit as broad as long or longer than broad; rind yellow (7-10), yellow-orange (11), orange (12), or red-orange (13); rind texture slightly rough (4-5); firmness leathery; navel absent; flesh orange; taste acidic-sweet.

Hodgson (1967) provided the following additional notes on the cultivar:

"Fruit medium-sized, spherical to slightly obovate; basal area sometimes depressed and radially furrowed; commonly with faint areolar ring; moderately seedy. Well-colored (one of the best in Florida). Rind medium-thick; surface finely pitted and slightly pebbled. Flesh color light orange; tender, juicy; flavor rich though sweet. Midseason in maturity. Does not hold on tree as well as some, but excellent for processing.

Tree moderately vigorous, medium-large, thornless, and highly productive. More sensitive to frost than most."

The Chiefland Budwood Facility (2010) provided the following additional notes on the cultivar (clone 53-10-10): "The peel is more orange, yields are less than nucellar pineapple selections and fruiting tends towards alternate bearing."

The Chiefland Budwood Facility (2010) provided the following additional notes on the cultivar (clone F-60-3): "Fruit size and yields are slightly larger than old-line fruit. Other characteristics are similar to the typical Pineapple cultivar."

Notes

 

The Chiefland Budwood Facility (2010) provided the following notes on the cultivar (clone 53-10-10): "Its chief claim to fame is that it has been referred to as the red Pineapple."

References

 

Bayer, R.J., D.J. Mabberley, C. Morton, C.H. Miller, I.K. Sharma, B.E. Pfeil, S. Rich, R. Hitchcock, and S. Sykes. 2009. A molecular phylogeny of the orange subfamily (Rutaceae: Aurantioideae) using nine cpDNA sequences. American Journal of Botany 96: 668–685.

Chiefland Budwood Facility. 2010. 2010 Annual report July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2010. Bureau of Citrus Budwood Registration, Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services, Winter Haven.

Cottin, R. 2002. Citrus of the World: A citrus directory. Version 2.0. France: SRA INRA-CIRAD.

Hodgson, R.W. 1967. Horticultural varieties of Citrus. In: Reuther, W., H.J. Webber, and L.D. Batchelor (eds.). The Citrus industry, rev. University of California Press. http://lib.ucr.edu/agnic/webber/Vol1/Chapter4.html.

Mabberley, D.J. 1997. A classification for edible Citrus (Rutaceae). Telopea 7: 167–172.

Swingle, W.T. and P.C. Reece. 1967. The botany of Citrus and its wild relatives. In: Reuther, W., H.J. Webber, and L.D. Batchelor (eds.). The Citrus industry. Ed. 2. Vol. I. University of California, Riverside. http://lib.ucr.edu/agnic/webber/Vol1/Chapter3.html.

Ziegler, L.W. and H.S. Wolfe. 1961. Citrus growing in Florida. University of Florida Press, Gainesville. 248 pp.

Resources

 

Search for this cultivar in NCBI Entrez, NCBI Nucleotide, or NCBI Expressed Sequence Tags

 

Citrus ID Edition 2
October, 2011
idtools.org